Frequently Asked Questions

Who are we?

Below you will find answers to the most frequently asked questions.

Who are we?

The reception centre l’Enclos Rey is part of the non-profit association Chemins d’Espérance. The association manages around 20 EHPADs and associated services throughout France, including a 124 resident facility on the Grenelle site.

We share with our association values of intergenerational and intercultural welcome, sharing and respect.

To learn more about our history

What is the seminar and conference center l'Enclos Rey?

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In 1998, the Little Sisters of the Assumption decided to entrust the management of the Enclos Rey to the association Partage Solidarité Accueil created in 1989 to manage retirement homes. The needs for formation and the number of nuns being in decline, the place was under-exploited. Partner congregations and associations have since begun to reserve these premises. For twenty years, the almost exclusive hosting of associations and foundations has helped to give the Enclos Rey a privileged place of reflection, serenity and meeting. And this, in a preserved setting. Today, the conference centre is undergoing major changes. While preserving the original spirit, preserving the place, the reception centre is opening up to a new organisation, a redesign of its image, and is intended to be a place where the Chemins d'Espérance association can be heard.

What is the association Chemins d'Espérance?

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For nearly 50 years, the Chemins d'Espérance association has been welcoming elderly people affected by frailty and dependency, making human relations the core of its support project in 8 regions and 14 departments in France. Steeped in a Christian history that still inspires its project today, Chemins d'Espérance counts among its 21 houses, 18 EHPADs, 3 autonomous residences and also manages 1 home nursing care service (SSIAD). More than 1,000 salaried professionals are committed on a daily basis to an interpersonal relationship of support for the 1,700 people welcomed each year, preserving a place for their families and the volunteers around them. To meet the demands of our inspiration, we have set up and are deploying the "Vis l'âge" support programme as well as a demanding human resources policy of our own. We invite you to visit the Chemins d'Espérance website: http://www.cheminsdesperance.org.

Where did the name Enclos Rey come from?

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It's the name of a neighborhood in Nîmes. Indeed, in 1849, Father Etienne Pernet, founder of the Little Sisters of the Assumption, was strongly marked by the living conditions, extreme poverty and illness of this working-class neighborhood in the midst of the 19th industrial century: "I saw distress there that I hardly knew the name of". Faced with this human and social drama, he had the intuition that to remedy this situation a religious woman was needed to take on the family tasks in times of illness. This is how the Congregation of the Little Sisters of the Assumption was born. The nuns, owners of the Grenelle site where the Enclos Rey is located, have always been involved in social, educational and care activities by carrying out their apostolate.

What is the special place of the Enclos Rey within Chemins d'Espérance?

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Although having a commercial activity, the seminar centre retains its associative status. There is no shareholder compensation. The activity of room rental and hotel business is a specificity within the association. Indeed, the Chemins d'Espérance association manages around twenty EHPADs and associated services in different regions of France, supporting nearly 1,200 elderly people with a staff of more than 1,000 employees. We invite you to visit the Chemins d'Espérance website: http://www.cheminsdesperance.org/.

Who are the Little Sisters of the Assumption?

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The Congregation of the Little Sisters of the Assumption was founded in 1865 in France, at the beginning of industrialization, by Father Etienne PERNET, an Assumptionist, and Antoinette FAGE with the aim of "procuring the Glory of God through the salvation of the poor and the little ones. Through their daily action, the Little Sisters of the Assumption have built and have been the forerunners of what we today call home support and medico-social services. Today the congregation is present on all 5 continents.

The countryside in the Grenelle neighborhood?

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The Grenelle district takes its name from its soil composed of "granelle", a very fine sand. On this vast plain was a 100-hectare farmhouse.

Who was at 57 rue Violet before the Little Sisters of the Assumption arrived?

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Before the Little Sisters of the Assumption took possession of the premises, the house was occupied by an Ottoman school rented by the Turkish Consulate.

Who was Monsieur Violet?

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In the 19th century, when the congregation was established, it was the site of a relay for horses, one can easily imagine the sound of hooves on the cobblestones. The entrance at 98 bis rue du Théâtre impresses with its high walls and old Parisian paving. The head office of the Chemins d'Espérance association is now housed in the Membrey building built on the site of the stagecoach sheds.

Who were Etienne Pernet and Antoinette Fage?

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Étienne Pernet was born in Vellexon in Haute-Saône on 23 July 1824. He felt called to become a priest, and left his village to study at the school in Membrey, then successively in the seminaries of the region. Étienne Pernet joined Nîmes as a teacher at the college. He was ordained a priest in 1858 and became one of the first Assumptionists. In Paris, he met Marie Antoinette Fage in 1864 and from 1865 they gathered a group of sick guards to serve poor families at home. In 1870 the sisters moved to 57 Violet Street, which became the mother house of the new congregation. The Cause for the Beatification of Father Pernet was introduced in Rome and Pope John Paul II declared him "venerable" in 1983. (last step before beatification). This explains the names of the two EHPAD buildings for 124 residents on this Grenelle site. Their bodies lie in the chapel.

Where do the names of the rooms come from?

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Originally, the halls were used to bring together the Little Sisters of the Assumption, to group together novices who wished to commit themselves to religious life. Given the evolution of the congregation, these large spaces were no longer needed on a permanent basis. The idea came in 1998 to create the Enclos Rey and to welcome associations and foundations there, while preserving the possibility for the Little Sisters of the Assumption to continue to meet there for seminars. The names of the halls simply come from the continents in which the religious community is active.